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Smashbox “Girls On Film” Fall 2011 Makeup Collection Keeps You Picture Perfect

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There’s a reason why so many of Smashbox‘s cosmetics are designed to optimize a woman’s appearance when in front of a lens: the brand’s co-founder, Davis Factor, has snapped such pop culture icons as Angelina Jolie, Leighton Meester, Kim Kardashian, Christina Hendricks, and Naomi Watts. Having spent so much time stomping around photo sets, then, Factor knows first-hand that the way light falls on a woman’s face can change her entire countenance, altering the way a camera lens captures the planes of her face. Watch enough episodes of America’s Next Top Model and you’re likely to hear Tyra encourage contestants to move towards the light like moths to a flame.

Even if you’re not posing languidly for an editorial spread, you should appreciate the benefits of any makeup that brightens and illuminates the face, camouflaging dark circles and shadowy areas, helping to contour features, and giving the complexion a dewy glow. The Smashbox Photo Op Under Eye Brightener ($19 at Smashbox.com) can disguise dark under eye circles without leaving behind a thick, crease-prone, cake-like finish or clashing against your actual flesh tone. The soft, brush-like applicator wand allows you to simply dab a few dots beneath the eye and then pat onto the skin using your fingertips for a natural texture. The light-reflecting particles in the formula diffuse any dark patches, making eyes look wider and more alert. Similarly, the Smashbox Halo Highlighting Wand ($32 at Smashbox.com) features a thicker brush applicator that allows you to dispense a fluid, almost translucent, golden nude makeup onto any areas you wish to illuminate — be it your cheekbones, jawline, or the ridge of your nose.

In many ways, these brightening products could be considered the precursors of the new Smashbox “Girls On Film” Fall 2011 collection which, as its name implies, drew inspiration from the glam screen sirens of both the past and present time.

The key products in the collection are the two eye shadow palettes: the six-shadow Smashbox “Girls On Film” Softbox Palette and the “Girls On Film” Smokebox Palette ($42 each at Smashbox.com). Both palettes help to create smoky, come-hither eye looks but, while the Smokebox Palette incorporates mysterious and twilight-worthy shades of slate gray, dirty violet, and midnight blue, the Softbox Palette features earthier shades of champagne nude, dusky vanilla cream, grape-tinged taupe, brass-sprinkled brown, and shimmering copper. Each of the palettes offers both matte and pearly shadows, so that you can play with textures and finishes. To finish off your smoldering eye look, you simply have to invest in the Smashbox “Girls on Film” Cream Eye Liner & Travel Brush ($28 at Smashbox.com), which comes in Blacklight, an oily jet black with blue pearl particles, or Sepia, an olive brown with golden pearl shimmer.

Cheeks, meanwhile, can be infused with a healthy rosiness or contoured for a stronger, more angular look, with the Smashbox “Girls On Film” Blush Rush ($24 at Smashbox.com), available in Rosy Pink or Soft Nude, and packaged in a handy compact with a built-in swivel mirror for easy application.

And, since you’ll be focusing on a dramatic eye look, you can keep lips natural, with just a hint of sheen and a subtle tint. That’s where the Smashbox “Girls On Film” Lip Enhancing Gloss ($18 at Smashbox.com) comes in, a non-sticky gloss available in Underexposed, an antique winter rose shade, or Overexposed, a milky peachy pink hue.

Below, you’ll find swatches of the shades in the Smashbox “Girls On Film” Softbox Palette, along with photos of a sample look created.


Here, check out swatches of (from top to bottom) the Fizz, Pebble, Minx, Vanilla, Ignite, and Sienna eye shadows in the Softbox Palette. The shades are all earthy without being boring or one-dimensional, and they’re universally flattering, which makes them a no-brainer for gals of any complexion. I’m particularly fond of the Minx shade, since it fuses together a mineral umber color with a cool gray tone and it’s given a sophisticated boost with a hint of lavender shimmer.

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Below, check out another shot of (from left to right) the Sienna, Ignite,Vanilla, Minx, Pebble, and Fizz shadows.

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Next, check out a look I created with some of the products in the Smashbox Girls On Film collection.

To create this look, I started by applying the MAC Matchmaster Foundation SPF 15, then applied a dab of the Smashbox Photo Op Under Eye Brightener beneath my lower lash line. To highlight my cheekbones, I used the Smashbox Halo Highlighting Wand and layered the Lovelace Blush atop it for a rosy finish.

Moving on to the lids, I started by sweeping the Minx shadow on my lids, brushing the color up to the crease and then using a smaller brush to apply the color directly beneath the lower lash line. Next, I applied the Fizz shadow, a sparkling rose champagne hue, along the crease, making sure to blend it with the Minx color then, applying another coat along the crease and brow bone so that the lighter shade would predominate and illuminate the eyes. To further open the eyes, I applied just a hint of Fizz at the inner corners of eyes, right by the tear ducts.

Next, to give the eyes more dimension, I brushed the Sienna eye shadow to the outer third of lids, layering it above the Minx shade and blending these together for darker, more robust edges. Last, I applied two coats of Lancôme Hypnose Mascara. Check it out below!

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