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Orange Lips And Iridescent Eyes At The Creatures of the Wind Spring 2014 Show

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It’s almost poetic, at least in an art-imitates-another-form-of-art sort of way, that Creatures of the Wind designers Shane Gabier and Christopher Peters would draw inspiration from the colorful, near-apocalyptic, abstract landscape paintings of fringe artist Eugene von Buenchenhein (1910-1983) when creating their Spring 2014 collection. If Jason Pollock was known to have unorthodox painting methods, von Buenchenhein’s system would be considered downright kooky — not only did the Wisconsin native enjoy using his fingers as tools but he also crafted his own brushes using small sticks and strands of his wife Marie’s hair. But there was a method to his madness and his madness was often the stuff of genius. His “The Pile of Andrius” painting (1954), for instance, was made using oil on corrugated cardboard, and it features what appears to be a metropolis atop a mountain, a long flight of stairs leading to the palace-like structure on the summit, with dragon-like scales covering the sky behind this formation and fiery oranges, ochre yellows, and mystical greens creating an other-worldly feel. Creatures like sea anemones, fire-breathing dragons, imposing-looking squids and octopi, and extra-terrestrial forms abound in his paintings, which incorporate psychedelic and surreal elements. Even his photographs of his wife Marie throughout the 1950s had an otherworldly quality to them — and this, more than anything, seems to be what enchanted the Creatures of the Wind designers since, they too, seem fascinated with cerebral concepts, with notions of transcendence and the overall mysteries of the universe.

Dubbed “The Pale Hyperborea,” the Creatures of the Wind Spring 2014 collection was inspired by both Eugene von Bruenchenhein’s art and by their readings about Hyperborea, a mythical region in the northern lands, somewhere above Thraces, referenced in Greek mythology. According to ancient writings, Hyperborea was an idyllic place, one where muses were never absent and where creativity thrived constantly. It’s the type of place that the Creatures of the Wind designers — who have proven themselves to be innovative, artsy, and fiercely unique — would consider paradise.

Fusing together these sources of inspiration, then, the designers crafted a collection that was both eccentric and charming, whimsical but wearable. And, of course, the idea of the ephemeral, of the intangible, of the unknown, was a common thread throughout the collection. It even influenced the makeup look created for the show by James Boehmer, Director of Global Artistry for NARS Cosmetics.

To create an other-worldly feel, Boehmer gave models opalescent-textured eyelids using the NARS Iceland Duo Eyeshadow, which incorporates an icy iridescent pale green shadow and an icy iridescent pale blue shadow — both as close to white as possible but with different undertones.

Skin, meanwhile, remained fresh and radiant without appearing too dewy or too bronzed. To give models just the right amount of coverage, Boehmer used the NARS Stick Concealer and the new Radiant Cream Compact Foundation.

To add some “pow” to the look, Boehmer paired the arctic iridescence of the eyes with a fiery orange lip. The choice of the color seemed directly linked to Eugene von Bruechenhein’s paintings, which often incorporated vermilion and blood orange hues. To create this strong pout, Boehmer applied the NARS Red Square Velvet Matte Lip Pencil to lips and then covered this base color with the NARS Timanfaya Satin Lip Pencil, a new shade for Spring 2014. The result was a vibrant pout with a satin texture that instantly caught your attention, drawing you in as the opalescence of the lids created the sensation of it all being a cosmic vision, a fleeting glimpse into the land of abstractions.

 

 

 

 

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