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The New Smith & Cult Fall 2018 Nail Polish Shades Are Finger-Flaunting Good

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Since Hispanic Heritage Month comes to a close on October 15th (yes, it’s super weird, but it takes place from September 15th through October 15th rather than unfolding during a single designated calendar month), I thought it was only fitting to celebrate another beauty brand that has flourished largely thanks to the creative vision of one of its founders. I’m referring to Smith & Cult, the oh-so-cool nail lacquer brand founded by Iranian American entrepreneur Dineh Mohajer and Latina powerhouse Jeanne Chavez, whose father is of Mexican descent. Four-year-old brand Smith & Cult represents the two friends’ second venture into the beauty space: in the ’90s, they launched Hard Candy nail polishes, which spoke to young women everywhere due to the edgy color palette (shades like the light blue Sky gained cult status after being worn by Alicia Silverstone) and individualistic spirit. After selling Hard Candy in 1999, the pair joined forces once again to develop a new nail lacquer brand that exuded sophistication while maintaining the punk sensibility and out-of-the-box thinking that characterizes their creative output. Not only are Smith & Cult nail lacquers stunning and long-wearing, but they’re vegan and free of harmful toxins like toluene, formaldehyde, formaldehyde resin, and dibutyl phtalate.

This season, Mohajer and Chavez have introduced new additions to Smith & Cult’s Nailed collection of polishes — from The Message, a dark metallic crimson hue that somehow feels both festive and vamp-y, to A Short Reprise, a creamy lavender mauve with a moody vibe. I had the chance to test out four of these new shades: Forever Fades Fast, Analog Fog, Extra Ordinary, and Fosse Fingers. Each nail lacquer retails for $18 at SmithandCult.com and trust me when I tell you that these are just as addictive as those Hard Candy polishes of yore, but way more grown-up and chic.

Below, you’ll find more details on each hue as well as photos that showcase how they look when applied onto nails. Prepare to swoon!

FOREVER FADES FAST

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If you’d told me that I’d fall in love with a subtle peachy pink nail polish shade, I’d scoff and probably instinctively roll my eyes in disbelief. After all, I’m that girl who loves moody purples, edgy gunmetal and rose gold shades, brighter-than-the-sun neons, and all things with a major personality. Pastel shades have never really been my jam and, historically, any nude or pink hue that could be described using terms like “ballerina,” “whisper,” “petal,” “barely-there,” “pale,” or “delicate,” would automatically be dismissed. And yet here I am, absolutely lovestruck with Forever Fades Fast, an opaque pale rosette hue — yup, there’s that word I’d once abhorred: pale.

What do I love about this hue? Well, for starters, it goes with everything and yet it’s not as expected and boring as a nude or taupe hue. Second, it’s creamy and luxurious without ever clumping or appearing gunky (which creamy polishes have a tendency to do). And third, there’s that unique hue, which manages to blend peach and pink tones perfectly so that it feels a bit retro and yet totally modern at the same time. It may be a pale shade, but the complete, non-streaky coverage, combined with that brilliant shine make it feel anything but dainty or old-fashioned.

Check out the pics below:

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ANALOG FOG

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Described as an “opaque vibrant plum,” Analog Fog perfectly captures the tonality of a Java plum punch (seriously, do a Google image search!), but it pumps up the volume by making the pigments ultra-saturated to create a head-turning effect. The perfect balance of violet and red shades keeps this shade from venturing into the mulberry, aubergine, eggplant territory, so that it feels fresh and mysterious. In fact, it reminds me of the Eta Carina nebula photos I’ve stared at in absolute awe.

Check out the pics below:smith-and-cult-analog-fog-nail-polish-shade

 

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FOSSE FINGERS

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When you visit the Smith & Cult website, you’ll notice that each nail lacquer shade has an origin story of sorts, a vignette that explains the inspiration behind its creation. The story behind Fosse Fingers begins at the engagement party of a friend named Ruth. During the evening, Ruth’s pink diamond engagement ring sparkled beautifully and reflected some of the tones of a nearby chocolate fountain. That juxtaposition of metallic pink and warm chocolate brown inspired Fosse Fingers, which is described as a “metallic terracotta-ish.” I wouldn’t necessarily characterize the shade as terracotta — or even terracotta-ish — but it does have a warmth and an earthiness to it. What’s mesmerizing about this hue is that, initially, it appears to be a classic rose gold hue  but, as you behold it from different angles, more of those golden mocha undertones emerge to the surface. The pink shimmer, meanwhile, gives the shade dimension and adds to the overall sophistication of the metallic finish.

Check out some pics:

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EXTRA ORDINARY

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Looking for the perfect fuchsia pink? Then meet Extra Ordinary, a full-coverage, completely opaque fuchsia pink with a creme finish. It’s a dead ringer for Marilyn Monroe’s dress shade in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. It also reminds me of the strapless gown Rihanna wore to the 2007 VMAs, which is perhaps a more fitting reference since the nail lacquer has that same energy that RiRi was exuding: unapologetically feminine and sexy but also tough and daring. Check out the pic below!

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If you want to keep those nails looking amazing this season, make sure to check out this collection!

 

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